A Social Story About Obsessions: For Kids on the Spectrum

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Why I Have Obsessions: Social Story for Kids on the Spectrum

Hi. My Name is Jake. And today, I want to tell you why I have obsessions.

I often learn a lot about something I’m obsessed with, and I am very interested in it for a long time, and feel strongly about it. There are several reasons why I develop obsessions.

One. I get a lot of enjoyment from learning about a particular subject.

Two. I find social situations difficult, and sometimes I use my special interest as a way to start conversations, and feel more confident when I’m with my friends.

Three. obsessions help me cope with the uncertainties, of daily life

Four. They help me to relax and feel happy

Five. They provide order and predictability for me.

Six. obsessions provide structure, and routine, which makes me feel safe.

Seven. It’s hard for me to deal with change. If unexpected changes occur, I may have a meltdown, which means, my thoughts are racing too fast.

So, during stressful times, I try to distract myself with an activity that calms me down. And that activity is usually my obsession, or special interest.

So, to all the parents out there, if your child with autism has obsessions, sometimes, they help him to be less worried about things. And that’s a good thing.

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