Sensory Overload in Autism



Teaching Social Skills and Emotion Management

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

Thank you for sharing. It's so misunderstood, and very frustrating when you are judged as a bad parent when it is simply a case of your child not coping. I tried to explain it here http://wp.me/p1GiLs-13 but I think I'll add a link to this video as well, if that's ok.

Anonymous said...

Its.so hard to tell the difference, especially in my 3 year old.

Anonymous said...

It gets easier to tell as they get older and you watch for signals. Look for an escalation of agitation in situations this can happen fairly quickly but if you notice it and remove the child from the situation it will often go away quickly. Also, watch the eyes. They can show intent.

Anonymous said...

Looking back to when my son was younger (before I had a dx) I can definately see where he went through this. Fortunately, it has gotten better. I also know the signs and know how to diffuse it better now too. He has his moments, but at least I understand it now and know how to help him....

Anonymous said...

Just something I've written....

Isn't it a shame that this society discourages originality
Isn't it a shame that we are encouraged to be "normal"..whatever that means
Isn't it a shame that people judge, ridicule or dismiss others that appear "different"..whatever that means
Why do some of us have to run away from ourselves, just because society tells us we are LESS than
What gives us the right to think we are MORE than others who do not fit into a society that breeds perfectionists, selfishness and egos

This society is the problem....not the individual who is born, has become or has chosen to be different...whatever that means.

Anonymous said...

We go through this alot. We've learned to not only recognize the signs, but anticipate situations that will overflow our child's sensory cup. Like a tip to the airport, for example. In these situations we prepare him with a social story, have headphones on hand and look for opportunities to get him to focus on a singular thing so that he may attempt to ignore the others. We also avoid a lot of places that we know he will not do well in. I'd never take him to a stadium for a sporting event and he cannot tolerate the cinema.

Anonymous said...

This point is interesting for those who have family members and friends who say how the asperger child 'behaves' fine for them (implying that you as the parent must be doing something wrong because they act out at home and other places!). The key difference is the stimulation level. I find that my son is far better behaved in a one on one situation even with myself. However, placing him in a busy area with boisterous siblings and a lot of noise seems to make it almost impossible for him to regulate his behaviour at times. I've had him in tears at a child's 7th birthday party because the kids were cheering and screaming and shouting, he simply found it too loud and distressing. Hopefully with the new advertising and awareness campaigns around aspergers in Australia people may gain a better understanding... :)

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